Info

Disaster Recovery Roundtable

This podcast is a platform to explore, engage, and educate the emergency management community and will feature guests from diverse emergency management disciplines to discuss mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery topics intended to promote the exchange of ideas and best practices. Episode topics are developed from our team of disaster experts, listeners, and the clients we serve.
RSS Feed
Disaster Recovery Roundtable
2021
March
February


2020
December
November
October
September
August
June
May


All Episodes
Archives
Now displaying: Page 1
Mar 5, 2021

A California campaign is helping to engage the most vulnerable in that state as they promote five steps for safety and survival from disasters. In this episode of Disaster Recovery Roundtable, we hear from Justin Knighten, the previous co-chair of the Listos California Preparedness Campaign, about how it is reaching targeted audiences to support personal preparedness.

Topics Covered:

  • Gov. Gavin Newsom and the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES) announced that the state’s emergency preparedness campaign (launched in August 2019) has surpassed its goal of engaging at least one million socially vulnerable Californians. The campaign, titled “Listos,” which means “ready” in Spanish, provides the communities it targets with accessible, in-language, and culturally competent disaster readiness information.
  • Along with California Volunteers, another state-managed program, Listos California, which is anchored at Cal OES, has provided more than 1.6 million Californians with information they would need in the event of a natural disaster.
  • The campaign is aimed at engaging community-based organizations, faith groups, social clubs, schools, civic or neighborhood groups to encourage five easy and free steps to prepare for a disaster like an earthquake, wildfire or flood.
  • The campaign provides simple tools and resources to build awareness and help get people in the community prepared.
  • Listos California’s tools differ from many conventional preparedness lessons that too often fail to get people to act. Campaign organizers believe their approach will increase the chances of success and bring more communities closer to being ready for a disaster.

Additional Information:

 

Feb 24, 2021

The state of California continues recovery efforts from a historic wildfire season which included some of the largest fires (in acreage burned) in state —second only to the COVID-19 pandemic for worst disasters of the year. By the end of December, over 9,000 fires burned nearly 4.4 million acres, or about 4% of the state’s approximate 100 million acres of land. The August Complex Fire has been classified as the first “gigafire”- burning over 1 million acres across seven counties. It was one of several large-scale fires and ranked as the Top 5 of the 6 largest fires in California’s recorded wildfire history.    

Topics Covered:

  • The August Complex Fire has been classified as the first “gigafire”- burning over 1 million acres across seven counties. It was one of several large-scale fires and ranked as the Top 5 of the 6 largest fires in California’s recorded wildfire history.
  • Since August of last year, California has received 19 fire management assistance grants approved for 25 counties.
  • The year’s season was forecasted early in 2020 to be severe after an extremely dry January and February, which set the stage for a catastrophic season when extreme heat and high winds fueled hundreds of fires across the state in August and September.
  • Due to the nature of ongoing events that California has faced over the last several years, the state continues to evolve around the phases of emergency from Recovery to Preparedness to Mitigation back to Response and Recovery
  • The wildfires may be over, but now California is looking ahead to the next threats. The large burn scars could produce dangerous mud slides if heavy rains come through the rainy season. The state has been working closely with cities and counties throughout our Watershed Task Force to map out the possible threats and areas of risk where mudflows could be likely.

Additional Information:

Dec 10, 2020

As the first vaccines start rolling out, each state will be required to manage the vaccine distribution process to ensure targeted populations, health care workers, nursing home patients, etc. are able to receive the initial doses. 

In today’s episode of Disaster Recovery Roundtable Podcast, Tidal Basin CEO Daniel Craig says the biggest challenge for states will be managing the vaccine program.  

Topics Covered:

  • The FDA Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee is meeting to consider approving the first COVID-19 vaccine use in the U.S. The committee will consider emergency use authorization of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine with final FDA approval coming as early as this week (12/10/20).
  • The Pfizer-BioNTech group is requesting an “emergency use authorization,” shy of a full approval. The vaccine is desperately needed as public health experts warn virus cases will continue to climb. As of December 10th, there have been more than 15.3 million cases and 289,000 deaths have been reported, according to Johns Hopkins University data
  • As the first vaccines start rolling out, each state will be required to manage the vaccine distribution process to ensure targeted populations, health care workers, nursing home patients, etc. are able to receive the initial doses.

Additional Information:

Dec 10, 2020

As the first vaccines start rolling out, each state will be required to manage the vaccine distribution process to ensure targeted populations, health care workers, nursing home patients, etc. are able to receive the initial doses. 

In today’s episode of Disaster Recovery Roundtable Podcast, Tidal Basin CEO Daniel Craig says the biggest challenge for states will be managing the vaccine program.  

Topics Covered:

  • The FDA Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee is meeting to consider approving the first COVID-19 vaccine use in the U.S. The committee will consider emergency use authorization of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine with final FDA approval coming as early as this week (12/10/20).
  • The Pfizer-BioNTech group is requesting an “emergency use authorization,” shy of a full approval. The vaccine is desperately needed as public health experts warn virus cases will continue to climb. As of December 10th, there have been more than 15.3 million cases and 289,000 deaths have been reported, according to Johns Hopkins University data
  • As the first vaccines start rolling out, each state will be required to manage the vaccine distribution process to ensure targeted populations, health care workers, nursing home patients, etc. are able to receive the initial doses.

Additional Information:

Dec 10, 2020

As the first vaccines start rolling out, each state will be required to manage the vaccine distribution process to ensure targeted populations, health care workers, nursing home patients, etc. are able to receive the initial doses. 

In today’s episode of Disaster Recovery Roundtable Podcast, Tidal Basin CEO Daniel Craig says the biggest challenge for states will be managing the vaccine program.  

Topics Covered:

  • The FDA Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee is meeting to consider approving the first COVID-19 vaccine use in the U.S. The committee will consider emergency use authorization of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine with final FDA approval coming as early as this week (12/10/20).
  • The Pfizer-BioNTech group is requesting an “emergency use authorization,” shy of a full approval. The vaccine is desperately needed as public health experts warn virus cases will continue to climb. As of December 10th, there have been more than 15.3 million cases and 289,000 deaths have been reported, according to Johns Hopkins University data
  • As the first vaccines start rolling out, each state will be required to manage the vaccine distribution process to ensure targeted populations, health care workers, nursing home patients, etc. are able to receive the initial doses.

Additional Information:

Dec 10, 2020

As the first vaccines start rolling out, each state will be required to manage the vaccine distribution process to ensure targeted populations, health care workers, nursing home patients, etc. are able to receive the initial doses. 

In today’s episode of Disaster Recovery Roundtable Podcast, Tidal Basin CEO Daniel Craig says the biggest challenge for states will be managing the vaccine program.  

Topics Covered:

  • The FDA Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee is meeting to consider approving the first COVID-19 vaccine use in the U.S. The committee will consider emergency use authorization of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine with final FDA approval coming as early as this week (12/10/20).
  • The Pfizer-BioNTech group is requesting an “emergency use authorization,” shy of a full approval. The vaccine is desperately needed as public health experts warn virus cases will continue to climb. As of December 10th, there have been more than 15.3 million cases and 289,000 deaths have been reported, according to Johns Hopkins University data
  • As the first vaccines start rolling out, each state will be required to manage the vaccine distribution process to ensure targeted populations, health care workers, nursing home patients, etc. are able to receive the initial doses.

Additional Information:

Dec 8, 2020

The United Way has a dedicated Disaster Services division to support local chapters and the communities they serve in preparing and recovering from disasters. This support includes preparing the chapters and their staff to be prepared for events in their community, in addition to positioning their resources to support the recovery of the entire community from events. We’ll hear from the Director of Disaster Services, Tinika Fails, on how her division is supporting the 1,100 chapters in all 50 states and U.S. territories.

Key Takeaways

  • The United Way Worldwide operation supports communities and local United Way chapters in preparing for, responding to, and recovering from disasters. Local chapters help to provide information to the public after a disaster through utilizing their 211 Network.
  • This year has been very challenging for communities as they respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. The United Way has been working in partnership with local emergency management to support the needs of the community and to help with local disaster recovery efforts.
  • The United Way is a member of the National Volunteer Organizations Active in Disasters (VOAD) which coordinates with other non-profits to help communities prepare for and respond to disasters.

Additional Information

Nov 30, 2020

The 2020 hurricane season ends November 30th. This hurricane season resulted in historic impacts across the U.S. including a record five landfalling storms hitting Louisiana. The effects from this season were felt in almost every state along the Gulf Coast and up the Eastern Seaboard of the U.S. In fact, every coastal county or parish east of the Mississippi — except one — was under a tropical-related watch or warning at some point during the season. To put this historic season in perspective we welcome back Dr. Phil Klotzbach — one of the world’s leading researchers in tropical meteorology and heads up the research division at Colorado State University. 

Key Takeaways

  • One of the major takeaways from the 2020 Hurricane Season was the number of storms that underwent rapid intensification right at landfall. Another impact from this record season was the unusual activity in the last third of the season in October and November.
  • Louisiana was the hardest hit state with an historic five landfalling storms. This season’s atmospheric conditions produced a favorable environment for storms, especially in the Gulf of Mexico.
  • As Dr. Klotzbach looks ahead to 2021 he predicts no significant El Nino or other major change in the atmosphere to indicate a dramatic change in next year’s season. Although, he doubts we will see the 2020 record number of storms repeated.  

Supplemental Links:

Nov 11, 2020

The United Way has over 1,100 chapters around the United States supporting needs in local communities. The United Way of the Mohawk Valley serves Oneida and Herkimer Counties in the Utica area of Upstate New York. The agency supports a variety of community programs including food banks, after school programs, job and career programs, tax filing services, and hosting the communities 2-1-1 network. 

About the United Way of the Mohawk Valley

United Way of the Mohawk Valley is an independent, volunteer-led, locally governed, non-profit organization that has been serving the people of the Mohawk Valley since 1921.

The Mohawk Valley chapter began as the Utica Community Chest on November 1, 1921. Founding executives included Fredrick T. Proctor, Warnick J. Kernan, and Frank X. Matt. Our United Way addresses the root causes of key issues, is accountable for stewardship of resources, and is accountable for short-term and long-term results. We partner with community volunteers to best serve the Mohawk Valley with the Board of Directors and several committees made up entirely of local volunteer experts and professionals.

The United Way of the Mohawk Valley is one of the community's largest nonprofits, funding dozens of local programs and initiatives. They work with funding partners to ensure outcomes are being met and impact is being made. Through their Strategic Investment process, United Way carefully analyzes local needs, as well as social and economic changes in the community before thoroughly reviewing the agency’s request for support. This process allows the agency to make tough, yet smart, goal-oriented decisions regarding the region's most critical needs. To be considered for United Way funding, each program must meet a number of important standards, including but not limited to the following; the agency must provide a human care service that meets an important need in the community, be governed by a board of volunteers, be legally recognized as a not-for-profit organization, comply with New York State (not-for-profit) audit guidelines, and operate at a reasonable cost.

Topics Covered

  • The United Way of the Mohawk Valley serves communities of all sizes and demographic makeup in Oneida and Herkimer Counties in Upstate New York.
  • The organization has raised over $1 million dollars in a special COVID-19 fund to support the community’s needs during the pandemic.
  • The organization is expanding its services to provide fresh food for families who need additional support from being out of work or experiencing a change in wages, children being home from school more, and other impacts of the pandemic.
  • The United Way’s 2-1-1 system can be expanded in a disaster to provide a text response service to help in providing feedback from the public who may need assistance immediately following a disaster.
  • In late October – early November of 2019, heavy rainfall caused significant flooding in the Utica area. The United Way of the Mohawk Valley played a crucial role in providing support to those impacted by the floods. As a member of the Herkimer-Oneida Organizations Active in Disasters (HOOAD), the United Way engaged those impacted through use of the 2-1-1 network.
  • In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the United Way established a COVID-19 Fund in partnership with Community Foundation of Oneida and Herkimer Counites. Approximately $1 million was raised to purchase life-saving medical equipment, essential PPE, and cleaning supplies, increased access to food, offer technology support, and more. The Rising Phoenix Holdings Corporation provided donations to this fund. About 100,000 masks have been distributed to residents and organizations in need since March.
  • The United Way has created a Take and Make Meal Box campaign designed to provide meals for those impacted from the COVID pandemic. The program is being funded by a grant from the City of Utica and will support the distribution of over 4,500 boxes of food and supplies and hundreds of grocery store gift cards.

Additional Information:

Nov 5, 2020

The United Way has over 1,100 chapters around the United States supporting needs in local communities. The largest privately funded non-profit supports many needs, especially after a disaster. During 2020, the non-profit has stepped up to fill in the gaps typically provided by local organizations and agencies, including food banks, and other necessary services lacking as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.   

Topics Covered:

 

  • United Way’s local chapters adjusted how they deliver services during the pandemic to account for families who have kids home from school, family members losing their jobs, and those who need supplemental food.
  • Many local nonprofits are struggling to deliver their normal services due to the pandemic, and the United Way is helping to step in and support those needs.
  • There are many ways for people to support the United Way. They can volunteer virtually, donate to their local chapter, or volunteer in-person with United Way activities in the community.
  • This year the United Way has supported several major disasters around the U.S. including the California Wildfires, the Gulf Coast hurricanes, and the pandemic impacts in communities around the country.

Additional Information

Nov 3, 2020

Sonoma County California has been impacted by numerous weather-related disasters in the last few years — from a historic drought to devastating wildfires in three of the last four years. In between the county experienced flooding and mudslides. These events have changed how Sonoma County prepares for disasters by improving mitigation efforts, expanding community outreach programs, increasing funding for emergency management, and providing multiple sources to alert the public of threats. Sonoma County District 4 Supervisor, James Gore shares how the county improved response to recent wildfires in 2020 as it continues to build community resilience.

Key Takeaways

  • Mitigating for disasters is key to ensuring communities can survive and recover from events including: How do you pre-defeat fires, How do you address sea level rise, etc.
  • The Tubbs and Sonoma Complex fires of 2017 were a wake-up call for Sonoma County. It identified the need to better alert and for notification systems to warn the public of potential threats. It was resulted in changes to how Sonoma County prepares including additional funding for its emergency management program, development of public education campaigns, and establishing mitigation programs to prevent harsh impacts from disasters.
  • Climate factors have impacted how wildfires are fueled in California including historic droughts, and changes in wind patterns.
  • Significant improvements were made to expand communication systems across the county to enhance alert and warning capabilities.
  • Community Resilience needs support from both elected officials and the emergency management community in order to be successful.
  • Emergency Operations Centers need to operate as a preparedness center and not as a “bunker.”
  • Dedicated funding to support mitigation and preparedness efforts is essential.
  • Reviewing evacuation procedures and exercising for potential disasters is crucial to being ready for the next disaster.
  • It's crucial for communities to routinely test their early warning and notification systems on a regular basis.

Additional information:

Oct 29, 2020

The national Firewise USA® recognition program provides a collaborative framework to help neighbors in a geographic area get organized, find direction, and take action to increase the ignition resistance of their homes and community and to reduce wildfire risks at the local level. Any community that meets a set of voluntary criteria on an annual basis and retains an “In Good Standing Status” may identify itself as being a Firewise® Site.  

The Firewise USA® program is administered by NFPA® and is co-sponsored by the USDA Forest Service and the National Association of State Foresters. While the NFPA® administers this program, individuals and communities participate on a voluntary basis. The NFPA® disclaims liability for any personal injury, property, or other damages of any nature whatsoever, whether special, indirect, consequential or compensatory, directly or indirectly resulting from participation in the Firewise USA® program. The NFPA® also makes no guaranty or warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of program guidance. 

To learn more about NFPA’s Firewise USA program visit https://www.nfpa.org/Public-Education/Fire-causes-and-risks/Wildfire/Firewise-USA

 

Sep 25, 2020

Youth Preparedness is a key focus for FEMA in creating a Culture of Preparedness in the U.S. In this episode of Disaster Recovery Roundtable we’re joined by FEMA’s Branch Chief for Preparedness Programs, Allison Carlock, as she shares the importance of engaging youth to increase community preparedness. Allison will also share tips on how emergency managers can start a youth program in their own community.   

Sep 18, 2020

Learn how devastating and catastrophic EF 5 tornadoes severely impacted Joplin Missouri and Moore, Oklahoma. And how can you prepare for such a destructive tornado. 

EF 5 Tornadoes are the strongest storms on earth with winds more than 200 mph and in 1999 one tornado produced a record wind speed of 314 miles per hour as it was devastating Moore, Oklahoma.  To survive a tornado, you need to have a sturdy room in the lowest level of a secure home on a foundation. It is not recommended to try and out run a tornado, but the most devastating twisters can be life threatening if you are not in a secure shelter.  The last EF 5 tornado recorded in the U.S. hit Moore, Oklahoma in May, 2013.

Sep 7, 2020

On September 2, 1935, a disaster was unfolding in the Florida Keys as a category 5 hurricane with winds estimated near 185 mph made landfall on Long Key in Monroe County. As the storm’s center moved on shore, the barometric pressure was recorded at 892 millibars, the lowest on record in the U.S. The storm devastated the Keys and killed hundreds, including over 250 WWI veterans who were helping to build a new railroad across the Keys.

The Labor Day Hurricane of 1935 remains the strongest on record to ever strike the United States with an estimated pressure of 982 millibars and winds over 185 miles per hour. The storm killed over 400 as it swept across the Florida Keys on Labor Day in 1935. Dr. Steve Lyons says we need a new way to classify the threats of hurricanes and hopes NOAA will retire the Saffir Simpson rating scale and instead use a threat scale based on each individual storm. 

Sep 3, 2020

In recent weeks, several major disasters have crippled the power grid infrastructure in several states. Tropical Storm Isaias, the Iowa derecho, and Hurricane Laura demonstrate how disasters can severely impact power systems and prolong the recovery period. In this episode of Disaster Recovery Roundtable, we’ll visit Des Moines where a cluster of severe storms devastated Iowa and several neighboring states with hurricane force winds. Our guests include the Des Moines office of the National Weather Service and Iowa’s State Director of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. We’ll also hear from Georgia Power, and Tidal Basin’s Vice President of Preparedness, Resilience, and Emergency Management on preparing and mitigating for mass power outages.

Aug 18, 2020

Tidal Basin welcomes FEMA’s former Acting Deputy Administrator for Resilience as our new Chief Development Officer. Carlos will be overseeing the growth functions of the company and operations in the Caribbean.

Building codes must be updated to minimize the impacts from major disasters like hurricanes and earthquakes. The U.S. has made progress since historic storms like Hurricane Andrew in 1992.  But there remain some areas in the U.S. that still need to improve building codes to current standards.

There are opportunities for communities to increase resilience, one opportunity is with FEMA’s Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (#BRIC) Program providing funding opportunities available to communities. BRIC supports states, local communities, tribes and territories as they undertake hazard mitigation projects, reducing the risks they face from disasters and natural hazards. BRIC is a new FEMA pre-disaster hazard mitigation program that replaces the existing Pre-Disaster Mitigation (PDM) program.  #FEMA #mitigation

Jun 24, 2020

Diversity in America has become the leading headline in recent weeks due to events around the country. How diversified is emergency management – and how does that impact treatment and distribution of resources? In this podcast we are joined by representatives from the Institute for Diversity and Inclusion in Emergency Management for a candid discussion on equality within our industry. In addition, Tidal Basin CEO Dan Craig will conclude the discussion with a special announcement about a new diversity scholarship opportunity.

The Institute for Diversity and Inclusion in Emergency Management was founded after cofounders Chauncia Willis and others experienced varying levels of racism, bias, and inequality within the emergency management sector. Personal bias can impact how emergency management programs are implemented at the local level, especially for underserved areas. The organization aims to increase community resilience, especially for underserved communities, through diversity and inclusion for equity in emergency management. Tidal Basin CEO Daniel Craig demonstrated a commitment to I-DIEM’s mission with the announcement of a new student scholarship program supported by a donation of $5,000 each from Tidal Basin and from Mr. Craig.

Tidal Basin’s donation will be supporting a new student scholarship program named in recognition of Lt. General Julius W. Becton, Jr., the first minority to serve as FEMA Director from 1985 to 1989. The Julius W. Becton-IDIEM Student Scholarship Fund will support diverse students in the field of emergency management.

Jun 5, 2020

In this episode of Disaster Recovery Roundtable, we hear how emergency managers in Florida, Virginia, and Texas are preparing for the start of hurricane season. They’ll share unique circumstances and considerations in their communities, including how they are planning for potential COVID-19 impacts if a threat develops.

Emergency Managers are preparing for the start of the 2020 Hurricane Season under unique circumstances as they develop response considerations for the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Palm Beach County, Florida; Virginia Beach, Virginia and the City of Houston have developed specific response plans and guidance to minimize COVID-19 impacts if sheltering is necessary during this hurricane season. Other considerations that all three communities are addressing include mitigating for the public’s fear or reluctance to evacuate due to COVID-19 concerns.

Jun 4, 2020

Puerto Rico was devastated in 2017 by Hurricanes Irma and Maria, which left behind billions of dollars in damages. In this episode, we’ll hear from the lead of FEMA’s Mitigation Assessment Team for the 2017 storms and have an update on the island’s current mitigation efforts from the previous State Hazard Mitigation Officer for Puerto Rico.

The Building Science Branch of FEMA's Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration (FIMA) oversees the Mitigation Assessment Team project to support the identification of mitigation requirements after a major disaster. After Hurricanes Irma and Maria in 2017, the Mitigation Assessment Team, led by our first guest Stuart Adams, identified several key mitigation needs for Puerto Rico, including adopting an updated building code. The key to any successful mitigation program is ensuring recommendations are implemented by state and local communities. Our second guest in this episode, Tidal Basin’s Senior Director of Recovery Jose Valenzuela, will share how Puerto Rico implemented FEMA’s mitigation recommendations from the 2017 Mitigation Assessment Team report.

 

Jun 3, 2020

The Tropical Meteorology Project at Colorado State University has been releasing a seasonal hurricane forecast every year since 1984 under Dr. William Gray. Dr. Phil Klotzbach currently leads the research program and is well known among the emergency management community for his annual forecasts. Dr. Klotzbach will share details of his first released forecast of the season and indications on how the forecast might be changing on the eve of an updated forecast, which will be released by Colorado State on June 4, 2020.

Although the official start to hurricane season was on June 1, storms had already formed by the end of May, with Tropical Storm Cristobal forming on June 2 – the earliest third named storm on record in the Tropical Atlantic Basin. Dr. Phil Klotzbach will share how atmospheric factors influence the annual seasonal forecast and will provide clues on whether the April forecast numbers will change due to the early activity. Dr. Klotzbach will also reinforce why the emergency management community will need to take COVID-19 into consideration as they prepare for the season.

Jun 2, 2020

Disaster Recovery Roundtable welcomes Leslie Chapman Henderson with the Federal Alliance for Safe Homes (FLASH) to discuss their hurricane mitigation and preparedness programs. Leslie will share information available to emergency managers as they prepare for hurricane season, including the latest on the Hurricane Strong initiative, efforts to promote improved building codes, COVID-19 impacts to their operations, and details about a new FLASH podcast.

The Federal Alliance for Safe Homes (FLASH) was formed as a volunteer committee in the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew in 1992, and today supports emergency managers and others in preparing for disasters. The organization is best known for its efforts to promote stronger building codes in coastal states prone to hurricanes. FLASH’s CEO Leslie Chapman-Henderson will share the latest opportunities available to communities promoting hurricane resilience through the Hurricane Strong designation initiative and how they are updating the program based on a new survey of public input based on this year’s concerns with COVID-19.

May 31, 2020

Disaster Recovery Roundtable host Greg Padgett and Director of the National Hurricane Center Ken Graham discuss preparing for the start of hurricane season. The discussion centers around a recap of last season; how the COVID-19 pandemic is impacting the hurricane center’s engagement, operations, and planning for the season; and the new products available for the 2020 season including new forecast tools for emergency managers. Ken also shares his message for the public on preparing for the season.

1